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Marcia Ross

Here is Jenny Tucker’s story about her recent experiencing performing in Terrence McNally’s FRANKIE AND JOHNNY IN THE CLAIR DE LUNE

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Just heard that you’re making a film about Mr. McNally’s works.  I recently had the pleasure of playing Frankie in a production of Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, produced by L.I.P. Service Productions, based in Ft. Worth, TX.  I cannot say enough about how this piece has changed the way I see others and the process I underwent in taking on this piece.

They say we can never understand another person until we walk a mile in their shoes.  My life, as it’s been lived thus far, has been so different from Frankie’s and yet how she’s written made me feel like I can connect with her on so many levels.  It took me a journey of 5 years to decide to agree to take on the role, and now, I wish I’d done it so much earlier.  Mr. McNally’s writing is brutally raw and says the things in a natural way that some of us don’t ever dare to say.

I think maybe that’s what I appreciated most about his work.  He expresses without hesitation or fear what people feel deep inside but may never say and yet those characters managed to come out of it slightly bruised, but happier and freer because of the honesty and are able to move forward from there.  I had the pleasure of working with an amazing team, Stefany Cambra, our director who was truthful and honest in situations I hadn’t experienced or didn’t understand and Jason Leyva, who played Johnny, and was so amazing and professional and gave me something to work with at every turn.  I think if I had the chance, I could do this show, with this team, for an extended period of time and learn something new each time.

Thank you Terrence McNally for the opportunity!

Jenny Tucker

We would love to hear from anyone who has been involved in a production of Terrence McNally’s work. Please tell us your story and include photos/short video.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont

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LESSON # 1: THE LAW IS ABOUT REAL PEOPLE.

Lawyers (and law professors and law students) love debating strategies and tactics and researching case law to develop legal theories. But the law is about more than just an interesting intellectual exercise – it profoundly affects people and the quality of their lives. The law tells a story about who we are as a society, how we view ourselves, and how we view one another. All cases — whether they involve civil rights or some other issue entirely — should remember and consider the humanity behind all the creative legal arguments.

LESSON # 2: LITIGATION DOESN’T HAPPEN IN A VACUUM.

The best legal citations and strategies in the world won’t be successful if the political and educational stars aren’t aligned. Judges are human, and every judicial decision is subject to a political response. So, it’s crucial in a civil rights case for the lawyers and their clients and their supporters to engage in ongoing, thoughtful conversations with the community at large, to flesh out concerns and hopefully garner support for the issue. These conversations are always time-consuming and exhausting, and are frequently contentious and painful – but they are critical to your ultimate success.

LESSON # 3: DON’T FORGET YOUR STATE CONSTITUTION.

In law school you learn that if you’re challenging the constitutionality of a law and you get “heightened scrutiny,” you win — but if you only get “rational basis,” you lose. This may be true under the federal constitution, but the standard and analysis under your state constitution may be different – and might be more promising for your case. Even if your state constitutional provisions haven’t been fleshed out in prior cases, don’t shy away from pushing for an interpretation of the state constitution that is more nuanced than the the analysis under the federal Constitution.

LESSON # 4: EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED.

Sometimes courts decide something completely out of the blue. In the Vermont marriage equality case, we were prepared for a win, and we were prepared for a loss. We were not prepared for what we got: a ruling that gay and lesbian Vermonters were entitled to the “benefits” of marriage but would have to battle in the political cauldron of the legislature to seek the “status” and “title” of marriage. We went from arguing in the court room to lobbying in the statehouse, and ended up with the compromise of “civil unions” for nine years, before the Vermont legislature finally passed a marriage equality law. The lesson: be ready for a curveball.

LESSON # 5: DON’T FORGET TO HAVE FUN – AND DON’T LET EGOS GET IN THE WAY.

Litigating civil rights cases, especially high-profile ones, is hard work. You can’t do it alone – you need co-counsel to divvy up the work. And, you can’t do it well if you aren’t prepared to check your ego at the door and work cooperatively with co-counsel. Put aside your desire to be the “top dog,” and figure which of you is best suited for which task. (If that means you don’t get to argue before the US Supreme Court, so be it; remember that you need to act in the best interest of your client, not in the best interest of your reputation or ego.) A side benefit of this approach: you’ll have a much, much better time.

Purchase The State Of Marriage on DVD here: 

 Buy at Amazon  But at Best Buy  But at Target But at Barnes & Noble

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont – Lesson 5

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LESSON # 5: DON’T FORGET TO HAVE FUN – AND DON’T LET EGOS GET IN THE WAY.

 

Litigating civil rights cases, especially high-profile ones, is hard work. You can’t do it alone – you need co-counsel to divvy up the work. And, you can’t do it well if you aren’t prepared to check your ego at the door and work cooperatively with co-counsel. Put aside your desire to be the “top dog,” and figure which of you is best suited for which task. (If that means you don’t get to argue before the US Supreme Court, so be it; remember that you need to act in the best interest of your client, not in the best interest of your reputation or ego.) A side benefit of this approach: you’ll have a much, much better time.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont – Lesson 4

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LESSON # 4:  EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED.

 

Sometimes courts decide something completely out of the blue.  In the Vermont marriage equality case, we were prepared for a win, and we were prepared for a loss.  We were not prepared for what we got: a ruling that gay and lesbian Vermonters were entitled to the “benefits” of marriage but would have to battle in the political cauldron of the legislature to seek the “status” and “title” of marriage. We went from arguing in the court room to lobbying in the statehouse, and ended up with the compromise of “civil unions” for nine years, before the Vermont legislature finally passed a marriage equality law.  The lesson:  be ready for a curveball.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont – Lesson 3

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LESSON # 3: DON’T FORGET YOUR STATE CONSTITUTION.

 

In law school you learn that if you’re challenging the constitutionality of a law and you get “heightened scrutiny,” you win — but if you only get “rational basis,” you lose. This may be true under the federal constitution, but the standard and analysis under your state constitution may be different – and might be more promising for your case. Even if your state constitutional provisions haven’t been fleshed out in prior cases, don’t shy away from pushing for an interpretation of the state constitution that is more nuanced than the the analysis under the federal Constitution.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont – Lesson 2

By | Home, The State of Marriage | No Comments

LESSON # 2: LITIGATION DOESN’T HAPPEN IN A VACUUM

 

The best legal citations and strategies in the world won’t be successful if the political and educational stars aren’t aligned.  Judges are human, and every judicial decision is subject to a political response.  So, it’s crucial in a civil rights case for the lawyers and their clients and their supporters to engage in ongoing, thoughtful conversations with the community at large, to flesh out concerns and hopefully garner support for the issue.  These conversations are always time-consuming and exhausting, and are frequently contentious and painful – but they are critical to your ultimate success.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont

By | Home, The State of Marriage | No Comments

LESSON # 1: THE LAW IS ABOUT REAL PEOPLE.

Lawyers (and law professors and law students) love debating strategies and tactics and researching case law to develop legal theories.  But the law is about more than just an interesting intellectual exercise – it profoundly affects people and the quality of their lives.  The law tells a story about who we are as a society, how we view ourselves, and how we view one another.  All cases — whether they involve civil rights or some other issue entirely — should remember and consider the humanity behind all the creative legal arguments.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

COUNTDOWN to VALENTINE’S DAY & THE DVD RELEASE OF THE STATE OF MARRIAGE (#letlovewin)

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Now more than ever we must continue to support the fight for equality.

Download this image of the Let Love Win sign and take a photo with anyone you love and post it on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram with the #letlovewin & tag our account (FB: @FloatingWorldPictures; Twitter: @FWPictures; IG: @floatingworldpictures).  Once a week we will surprise someone with a DVD of the film and a personal thank you from the filmmakers. 

And we’re planning a special surprise for you on Valentine’s Day!

To download the Let Love Win image follow the below instructions.

Windows: right click with the mouse and choose Save image as…

Mac: press and hold down the Control button then click on the image using the mousepad. Choose Save Image As…

 

Marcia, LA