Now Available on DVD and Digital Download

Purchase the film and support the work of Father Joseph.

 

The Savoy King: Chick Webb and the Music That Changed America

Featuring Janet Jackson voicing the words of Ella Fitzgerald, and John Legend as Duke Ellington, plus Billy Crystal, Jeff Goldblum, Tyne Daly, Andy Garcia, Ron Perlman, Danny Glover, Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts, among others.

 

Education Under Fire

Education Under Fire profiles the growth, struggle, and inspiring spirit of the Baha ́i Institute for Higher Education. Baha ́i is in Iran have been subjected to systematic persecution, including arrests, torture, and execution simply for refusing to recant their beliefs.

 

Brush With Life: The Art of Being Edward Biberman

The story of artist Edward Biberman, most known for his Southern California urban landscapes and politically inspired murals, the impact of McCarthy-era repression on his artistic career and his extraordinary romance with his wife Sonia.

1
1
From feature documentaries to short films, Floating World Pictures produces stories that move, challenge, entertain, and inspire.



5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont

By | Home | No Comments

LESSON # 1: THE LAW IS ABOUT REAL PEOPLE.

Lawyers (and law professors and law students) love debating strategies and tactics and researching case law to develop legal theories. But the law is about more than just an interesting intellectual exercise – it profoundly affects people and the quality of their lives. The law tells a story about who we are as a society, how we view ourselves, and how we view one another. All cases — whether they involve civil rights or some other issue entirely — should remember and consider the humanity behind all the creative legal arguments.

LESSON # 2: LITIGATION DOESN’T HAPPEN IN A VACUUM.

The best legal citations and strategies in the world won’t be successful if the political and educational stars aren’t aligned. Judges are human, and every judicial decision is subject to a political response. So, it’s crucial in a civil rights case for the lawyers and their clients and their supporters to engage in ongoing, thoughtful conversations with the community at large, to flesh out concerns and hopefully garner support for the issue. These conversations are always time-consuming and exhausting, and are frequently contentious and painful – but they are critical to your ultimate success.

LESSON # 3: DON’T FORGET YOUR STATE CONSTITUTION.

In law school you learn that if you’re challenging the constitutionality of a law and you get “heightened scrutiny,” you win — but if you only get “rational basis,” you lose. This may be true under the federal constitution, but the standard and analysis under your state constitution may be different – and might be more promising for your case. Even if your state constitutional provisions haven’t been fleshed out in prior cases, don’t shy away from pushing for an interpretation of the state constitution that is more nuanced than the the analysis under the federal Constitution.

LESSON # 4: EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED.

Sometimes courts decide something completely out of the blue. In the Vermont marriage equality case, we were prepared for a win, and we were prepared for a loss. We were not prepared for what we got: a ruling that gay and lesbian Vermonters were entitled to the “benefits” of marriage but would have to battle in the political cauldron of the legislature to seek the “status” and “title” of marriage. We went from arguing in the court room to lobbying in the statehouse, and ended up with the compromise of “civil unions” for nine years, before the Vermont legislature finally passed a marriage equality law. The lesson: be ready for a curveball.

LESSON # 5: DON’T FORGET TO HAVE FUN – AND DON’T LET EGOS GET IN THE WAY.

Litigating civil rights cases, especially high-profile ones, is hard work. You can’t do it alone – you need co-counsel to divvy up the work. And, you can’t do it well if you aren’t prepared to check your ego at the door and work cooperatively with co-counsel. Put aside your desire to be the “top dog,” and figure which of you is best suited for which task. (If that means you don’t get to argue before the US Supreme Court, so be it; remember that you need to act in the best interest of your client, not in the best interest of your reputation or ego.) A side benefit of this approach: you’ll have a much, much better time.

Purchase The State Of Marriage on DVD here: 

 Buy at Amazon  But at Best Buy  But at Target But at Barnes & Noble

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont – Lesson 5

By | Home, The State of Marriage | No Comments

LESSON # 5: DON’T FORGET TO HAVE FUN – AND DON’T LET EGOS GET IN THE WAY.

 

Litigating civil rights cases, especially high-profile ones, is hard work. You can’t do it alone – you need co-counsel to divvy up the work. And, you can’t do it well if you aren’t prepared to check your ego at the door and work cooperatively with co-counsel. Put aside your desire to be the “top dog,” and figure which of you is best suited for which task. (If that means you don’t get to argue before the US Supreme Court, so be it; remember that you need to act in the best interest of your client, not in the best interest of your reputation or ego.) A side benefit of this approach: you’ll have a much, much better time.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont – Lesson 4

By | Home, The State of Marriage | No Comments

LESSON # 4:  EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED.

 

Sometimes courts decide something completely out of the blue.  In the Vermont marriage equality case, we were prepared for a win, and we were prepared for a loss.  We were not prepared for what we got: a ruling that gay and lesbian Vermonters were entitled to the “benefits” of marriage but would have to battle in the political cauldron of the legislature to seek the “status” and “title” of marriage. We went from arguing in the court room to lobbying in the statehouse, and ended up with the compromise of “civil unions” for nine years, before the Vermont legislature finally passed a marriage equality law.  The lesson:  be ready for a curveball.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont – Lesson 3

By | Home, The State of Marriage, Uncategorized | No Comments

LESSON # 3: DON’T FORGET YOUR STATE CONSTITUTION.

 

In law school you learn that if you’re challenging the constitutionality of a law and you get “heightened scrutiny,” you win — but if you only get “rational basis,” you lose. This may be true under the federal constitution, but the standard and analysis under your state constitution may be different – and might be more promising for your case. Even if your state constitutional provisions haven’t been fleshed out in prior cases, don’t shy away from pushing for an interpretation of the state constitution that is more nuanced than the the analysis under the federal Constitution.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont – Lesson 2

By | Home, The State of Marriage | No Comments

LESSON # 2: LITIGATION DOESN’T HAPPEN IN A VACUUM

 

The best legal citations and strategies in the world won’t be successful if the political and educational stars aren’t aligned.  Judges are human, and every judicial decision is subject to a political response.  So, it’s crucial in a civil rights case for the lawyers and their clients and their supporters to engage in ongoing, thoughtful conversations with the community at large, to flesh out concerns and hopefully garner support for the issue.  These conversations are always time-consuming and exhausting, and are frequently contentious and painful – but they are critical to your ultimate success.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

5 Legal Lessons from Susan Murray Co-Counsel of Baker v. State of Vermont

By | Home, The State of Marriage | No Comments

LESSON # 1: THE LAW IS ABOUT REAL PEOPLE.

Lawyers (and law professors and law students) love debating strategies and tactics and researching case law to develop legal theories.  But the law is about more than just an interesting intellectual exercise – it profoundly affects people and the quality of their lives.  The law tells a story about who we are as a society, how we view ourselves, and how we view one another.  All cases — whether they involve civil rights or some other issue entirely — should remember and consider the humanity behind all the creative legal arguments.

 

You can learn more about Susan Murray’s legal practice here.

The State of Marriage

July 18, 2014

Father Joseph

Father Joseph

July 17, 2014

Terrence McNally: Every Act of Life

July 17, 2014

The Savoy King

July 16, 2014

Education Under Fire

Education Under Fire

July 15, 2014

Edward Biberman by Edward Weston

Brush With Life

July 14, 2014

Free Shane and Josh

Free Shane and Josh

July 13, 2014

Justice, Fraternity and Peace

Justice, Fraternity and Peace

July 12, 2014

Be a part of history. Find out how you can make a tax deductible contribution to The State of Marriage.

Participate Now

Find out more about the amazing work that Father Joseph is doing in Haiti and how you can participate with a tax deductible contribution.

Participate Now

THE STATE OF MARRIAGE

Vermont was the first state to grant legal recognition to same sex couples and it continued its pioneering ways by becoming the first state to make same sex marriage legal not from a court ruling, but because the legislature moved proactively to make it a new law.

Rachel Maddow, MSNBC anchor

FATHER JOSEPH

I try to empower the poor, young people, woman, and peasants. We want to help everyone recognize that they have a lot of gifts, even though they are poor, to give to the community by working together as a body. We can grow together as human beings and complete each other, and learn from each other. We can become bridge-builders and peacemakers, for ourselves, for the others, and for the world.

Father Joseph B. Philippe

THE SAVOY KING

The Savoy King is enjoyable and convincing . . . the vibrant doc is rewarding for any Swing fan and, given some colorful and heartstring-pulling elements, will likely inspire filmmakers in the audience to wonder about biopic rights.

The Hollywood Reporter